The Case for an African Federated State — Part 1 of 3

For centuries, for millennia, Africa has been the victim of aggression. The continent and its people have had to endure incessant invasions, an inhuman trade in African humanity, colonialism, cultural aggression, and the depletion of their natural resources and mineral wealth. There exists today a neo-colonial state of affairs whereby supposedly independent African nations are still politically and economically serving their “former” colonial masters. In fact, these imperial powers will without hesitation flex their military muscle in Africa whenever they feel their political or commercial interests are threatened by revolutionary elements. Although, in recent times, they have found it more cost efficient, not to mention more politically correct, to fund and supply weapons to their black lackeys who will do their bidding for them.

This phenomenon is facilitated by commonwealth (protectorate) nations who allow the colonial powers to maintain military contingents within their borders. What kind of madness is this? How many African nations have military bases in America, France or Britain?

This post was motivated by Cheikh Anta Diop’s Black Africa: The Economic and Cultural Basis for a Federated State. He reveals, provided national borders are dissolved, that Africa has the natural resources necessary to take care of itself. And African resources should be used for African people rather than to feed the economies of Europe and America (and increasingly, China).

Diop relates that the Shinrolowbe mines in Zaire are empty today because Belgian-American interests, anticipating the instability that would prevail in the colonies after the second world war, mined all of the uranium of the then Belgian Congo in less than ten years and stockpiled it in Belgium. This uranium was used in the Nagasaki and Hiroshima bombs, an event that killed as many as a quarter of a million Japanese.

Resource theft in Africa has been the norm rather than the exception, and with devastating consequences. The slave trade and colonialism have had the effect of depopulating the continent, denuding the land which leads to famine, creating political instability and incessant warfare, hopelessness, poverty, debt and dependence. The current neo-colonial state maintains these trends so that African people don’t have the energy, industry and resources to empower themselves and cut of the flow of milk and honey to Europe and America.

The formation of an African federated state is the only way to permanently put an end to the exploitation of Africa and African people. A federation is a consensual union of states subordinate to a central governing authority. The political, economic and military union of African states would make the continent, as well as the Diaspora, a world power to be reckoned with. African people would have a role in world affairs reminiscent of the glory days of Kemet (ancient Egypt). Only a confederation could carry out the massive coordination necessary to pool the vast resources of Africa for the good of all the people. Additionally, Africa would be able to defend herself from the aggression which has been such a part of her history over the past four thousand years.

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One Response to The Case for an African Federated State — Part 1 of 3

  1. THERE IS AN ORGANIZATION BASED IN AMERICA CALLED ‘AFRICOM’; A BRANCH OF THE U.S. GOVERNMENT THAT IS DESIGNED TO SOMEHOW RE-COLONIZE PATRS OF AFRICA WITH WHITE CITADELS, COLONIES, FORTIFICATIONS, AND ELITIST CORPORATIONS!!!!!! THIS ‘AFRICOMM’ IS SETTING UP NETWORKS OF COVERT WHITE POWER CITES WHICH WILL SOON DOMINATE THE BLACKS TOWARDS GENETIC DECIMATION AND GENOCIDE!!!!!! PLEASE E-MAIL ME BACK AND FIND OUT MORE ABOUT “AFRICOMM’. SPREAD THE WORD TO YOUR FRIENDS. THANK YOU.

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